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The title of this was originally:

Making a "well" like content on an image

Which was the users way of saying an image with depth that appears to go down into the space.

The title was edited to

How do I make icons on an image background appear debossed?

If someone does not know the term debossed then they're still not going to find this unless they ask the question and someone closes it as a duplicate. I think leaving the title on cases like this in their original .... rough form and then voting to close as duplicate to the correct terminology question is a better solution.

If someone looks up deboss now they're going to get a closed answer / redirect. If someone else tries to describe it like a "well" they're not going to find anything. Both of those could be avoided if we leave some of the poor terminology questions.

Alternatively, we could go in heavy-handed and edit the question to be:

What is the correct term for an image that has depth like a water well?

Or something of that nature. Then in the question show the picture, and ask for the term for it. Essentially making the original question into a terminology question.

How do I make icons on an image background appear debossed?

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    Mea culpa -- that was me. You're right, the title I proposed is rather obscure. I totally support Yisela's solution and will try to implement it in the future!
    – Vincent
    Feb 10 '14 at 12:00
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I've come across this situation a couple of times. In some cases, it's a difficult call, but I think there is an alternative solution that might make everyone relatively happy: Use both.

So, from your example:

How do I make icons on an image background appear debossed?

+

What is the correct term for an image that has depth like a water well?

=

How do I make icons on an image background appear in depth, like a water well (debossed)?

In this particular case there might not be too much use in the "well" word, as it is rather.. specific. But depth is definitely a keyword, so I think it helps if it's included in the title. Or sunken, like it's being used in this question.

Some examples of questions that try to add search terms in their titles:

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