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I think the question you referred to is probably off-topic. However I didn't downvote or comment to point this out, because I was unsure exactly how much "off-topic" it was. Clearly the images are a 3D render, however the question itself is definitely about product design.

As far as your question on packaging design is concerned, is packaging really 3D? Packaging is obviously 3D in nature, but it's ultimately just folded up 2D card with graphics/text printed on it - and still part of print design (and graphic design) in my opinion - and something a graphic designer is likely to be involved in, to some degree at least.

However, solid (3D) plastic objects are a different industry entirely - although there's still a visual element. I think it would be a stretch to say it's "graphic" - except perhaps for the logos which are printed on it.

Then again, the design of a product can still be very visual in nature (not merely functional), and aesthetics certainly come into play, whether it's a flat graphic, or something that is more sculptural/3D in nature. I have no problem with discussing the visual appearance/aestheics of such a design.

Suffice to say, I don't think user287001's answer really deserves 4 downvotes, and so I've upvoted that answer.

I think the question you referred to is probably off-topic. However I didn't downvote or comment to point this out, because I was unsure exactly how much "off-topic" it was. Clearly the images are a 3D render, however the question itself is definitely about product design.

As far as your question on packaging design is concerned, is packaging really 3D? Packaging is obviously 3D in nature, but it's ultimately just folded up 2D card with graphics/text printed on it - and still part of print design (and graphic design) in my opinion - and something a graphic designer is likely to be involved in, to some degree at least.

However, solid (3D) plastic objects are different industry entirely - although there's still a visual element. I think it would be a stretch to say it's "graphic" - except perhaps for the logos which are printed on it.

Then again, the design of a product can still be very visual in nature (not merely functional), and aesthetics certainly come into play, whether it's a flat graphic, or something that is more sculptural/3D in nature. I have no problem with discussing the visual appearance/aestheics of such a design.

Suffice to say, I don't think user287001's answer really deserves 4 downvotes, and so I've upvoted that answer.

I think the question you referred to is probably off-topic. However I didn't downvote or comment to point this out, because I was unsure exactly how much "off-topic" it was. Clearly the images are a 3D render, however the question itself is definitely about product design.

As far as your question on packaging design is concerned, is packaging really 3D? Packaging is obviously 3D in nature, but it's ultimately just folded up 2D card with graphics/text printed on it - and still part of print design (and graphic design) in my opinion - and something a graphic designer is likely to be involved in, to some degree at least.

However, solid (3D) plastic objects are a different industry entirely - although there's still a visual element. I think it would be a stretch to say it's "graphic" - except perhaps for the logos which are printed on it.

Then again, the design of a product can still be very visual in nature (not merely functional), and aesthetics certainly come into play, whether it's a flat graphic, or something that is more sculptural/3D in nature. I have no problem with discussing the visual appearance/aestheics of such a design.

Suffice to say, I don't think user287001's answer really deserves 4 downvotes, and so I've upvoted that answer.

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I think the question you referred to is probably off-topic. However I didn't downvote or comment to point this out, because I was unsure exactly how much "off-topic" it was. Clearly the images are a 3D render, however the question itself is definitely about product design.

As far as your question on packaging design is concerned, is packaging really 3D? Packaging is obviously 3D in nature, but it's ultimately just folded up 2D card with graphics/text printed on it - and still part of print design (and graphic design) in my opinion - and something a graphic designer is likely to be involved in, to some degree at least.

However, solid (3D) plastic objects are different industry entirely - although there's still a visual element. I think it would be a stretch to say it's "graphic" - except perhaps for the logos which are printed on it.

Then again, the design of a product can still be very visual in nature (not merely functional), and aesthetics certainly come into play, whether it's a flat graphic, or something that is more sculptural/3D in nature. I have no problem with discussing the visual appearance/aestheics of such a design.

Suffice to say, I don't think user287001's answer really deserves 4 downvotes, and so I've upvoted that answer.